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Gough, Bernard Bradly

We record with regret the death of Lieut. Bernard Bradly Gough, R.A.M.C., who was killed in action on the Western Front last week. Lieut. B. B. Gough was the second son of the late Mr. Henry Gough, barrister-at-law, of the Middle Temple, and of “Sandcroft”, Redhill. He was a brother of Dr. Alfred Gough, of Redhill, whose wife, before her marriage, was such a prominent worker in connection with the Battlebridge Guild, which owed a great measure of its success to her initiative and untiring labours.

Lieut. Bernard Bradly Gough was born at Stockwell on September 14th, 1873, and was educated at Reigate Grammar School and at St. Andrew’s, Caterham. He entered Guy’s Hospital as a student in 1892, and was admitted M.R.C.S. and L.R.C.P. in 1897. He held hospital appointments at Burton-on-Trent, Wolverhampton and Great Grimsby. After practising for a short time at Capel and Oakamoor, Staffordshire, he acquired a general practice at Compton Martin, Somerset, in 1902, where he resided until 1915.

Col. Julian sends the following letter to the relatives of Lieut. Gough:- “I deeply regret to inform you that on the evening of the 15th inst., whilst Lieut. B.B. Gough, R.A.M.C. was attending wounded in a dug-out near the trenches, a German shell fell into the dug-out and burst, instantaneously killing him and  nine wounded, one of whom was an officer. He died doing his duty to his utmost in the service of his King and country, and we, his comrades, lament his loss, and offer you our sincerest sympathy in your sad bereavement. He was at the time with the 8th Batt. South Staffordshire Regiment as their medical officer, to which battalion he had gone a few days before from the 51st Field Ambulance, in relief of a medical officer who had had to be sent to hospital ill. When found he had still a dressing and pair of scissors in his hands. Guy’s Hospital Reports Vol.LXX, War Memorial Number

Lieut, B. B. Gough married Miss Annie S. Longstaffe, Matron of Great Grimsby Hospital, in 1900, and leaves one daughter, born in 1906. Mrs B. B. Gough is now Commandant of the Military Hospital, Gournay Court, West Harptree, Somerset. In June, 1915, Dr. Gough obtained a commission in the R.A.M.C., and in the autumn was transferred from the R.G.A. to the Lahore British General Hospital at Calais. He was sent to the front early in February, and had been there little more than a week when he fell in action on Wednesday, the 16th. Particulars as to the engagement are not yet to hand.

The late gallant officer, who will be widely and sincerely mourned by a large circle of acquaintances and friends, was an ardent field naturalist and a keen observer, especially of bird life, and often conducted the excursions of the Holmesdale Natural History Club, of which he was for many years a member. The greatest sympathy has been extended to his mother and the other members of his family in their loss.

Col. Julian sends the following letter to the relatives of Lieut. Gough:- “I deeply regret to inform you that on the evening of the 15th inst., whilst Lieut. B. B. Gough, R.A.M.C. was attending wounded in a dug-out near the trenches, a German shell fell into the dug-out and burst, instantaneously killing him and nine wounded, one of whom was an officer. He died doing his duty to his utmost in the service of his King and Country, and we his comrades, lament his loss, and offer you our sincerest sympathy in your sad bereavement. He was at the time with the 8th Batt, South Staffordshire Regiment as their medical officer, to which battalion he had gone a few days before from the 51st Field Ambulance in relief of a medical officer who had had to be sent to hospital ill. When found he had still a dressing and a pair of scissors in his hands. His letters and effects have been taken over by the battalion, from whom you will doubtless hear in a few days. I enclose a letter and post card which have been delivered at my office.”

Lieut. F. G. Faby gives the following details of the death of Lieut. Gough:- “I arrived at the Aid Post shortly after Lieut. B. B. Gough had been killed by a shell entering the dug-out. I am sure that he did not suffer in the slightest, for death was instantaneous He was surrounded by the soldiers whose wounds he had been dressing. In fact, the late Lieut. Gough died with a surgical dressing in one hand and a pair of scissors in the other. I still have those scissors, and they will always remind me of a noble man who died at his post. I saw a great deal of him during those terrible days, and was struck by his devotion to the poor wounded. I have thought that you would like to hear from someone who had been associated with him. His brother officers deeply regret his loss. And will you please accept my sincere sympathy for you.” Guy’s Hospital Gazette, March 11th 1916.

Biographical

Surname(s)Gough
First name(s)Bernard Bradly
Date of birth14 September 1873
Place of birthStockwell
Family detailsSon of the late Henry Gough (Barrister-at-Law), of Sandcroft, Red Hill, Surrey; husband of Annie Sophia Gough, of East Harptree, Bristol
Previous educationReigate Grammar School; St. Andrew's Caterham
CollegeGuy's Hospital
Dates at college1892-1897
Dept / courseConjoint Diploma
QualificationsL.R.C.P., M.R.C.S.
Military unitR.A.M.C., South Staffordshire Regiment, attd 8th Bn.
War / conflictWorld War One (1914-1918)
Date of death17 February 1916
Age at death42
Rank at deathLieutenant
Cause of deathKilled in action
Burial placeWoods Cemetery, Ieper, Belgium
Commemoration(s)Guy's Hospital Memorial
SourcesGuy's Hospital Medical School Records, King's College London Archives; Commonwealth War Graves Commission

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