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  Item Reference: KCLCAL-1982-1983-19

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22 Sketch of the Development of King's College during his ten years of office-perhaps the most important decade in the history of the College-were to raise the tone and quality of academic work and to give staff and students the sense of real partici- pation in the self-conscious work of dignified university society cf his official life by Ronald Jasper 1960 Much of the evidence not excluding that of the statistics of staff and student expansion shows that his policy bore fruit Finances were improved and the status of the College was firmly established by its incorporation as part of the legal entity of the University itself step which later experience shows to have been of dubious value in respect of the retention of freedom and responsibility in business matters but one which was justified at the time in as much as University College had itself secured the same kind of incorporation with the superior status it seemed to imply The incorporation of the two colleges seemed to fortify the standing of the staff and to make reality of the concept of teaching university Thus the King's College London Transfer Act 1908 placed the larger part of the College within the legal fabric of the University so that its management became the province of delegacy of the Senate and ceased to rest with the council it also gave separate identity to the theological department-which was headed by the dean of the whole college with powers in some ways co-ordinate with the principal of University of London King's College-appointed by the Crown For time Headlam the father of number of shrewd compromises served both as principal and dean Not the least of his decisive actions was to persuade the College authorities that if it was to play its full part in university expansion the secular part of the College must cease to be denominational Religious tests for teachers of subjects other than theology were removed by Parliament in 1903 Changes Following Reconstitution College reorganisation correctly anticipated an expansion of degree work while the logic of the change recognised as it was in the Trans- fer Act itself compelled Headlam and his successor Burrows to shed whole range of what had now come to be regarded as peripheral activities The teaching of architecture was taken over by University College The departure of King's College School was in due course followed by that of the Strand School and the civil service department leaving room after reshuffles for more research laboratories The removal of King's College Hospital and its medical school from
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